“Dialogue” in five-on immigration and the difference

«Dialogue» à cinq sur l’immigration et la différence

Photo: Chris Randle
“Dialogue” is a piece for five dancers which explores the themes of human contact, of communication and of the language.

It took twenty-five years. Twenty-five years for the choreographer chinese-canadian Wen Wei Wang, now firmly entrenched in the canadian West, tackles choreography its experience of immigration. This impression of being abroad. The lack of understanding of the codes and of fine social boundaries. The difficulty, the impossibility even in the first time to be understood, if not by the gestures of the hands and the body language. This is the theme of Dialogue, a quintet entirely male created in 2017, which arrives in Montreal.

“You know, sometimes, when we experience something, we don’t really know… and when you are away from a situation, and even very far away, so we can begin to see clearly,” replied the one who is also artistic director of Ballet Edmonton when asked why it took him so long to address this topic.

«Dialogue» à cinq sur l’immigration et la différence

Photo: Shin-Sugino

“This is not a piece of policy,” he continued in English, it talks about the life of the people, of the lives of individuals. They come from each background different, a different country, roots, different ; one lives in a certain place that one tries to identify, understand as best as possible. I didn’t want to make a part policy, but it is a certain way : as soon as one puts together people of different nationalities, it becomes — and also sexual preferences are different. All that is in the room. But I want to talk about our lives today ; not the past, not the future ; I’m talking about today, what is happening now. “

In the studio, to create the creation, the choreographer has asked the performers to remember what their mothers cooked when they were little and they loved it. “What we prepare, when we cook, we use its hands, there is physical movement. There’s a dancer with whom we worked from the movement of the kneading to make bread. It has been the origin of its movement. “The access to the memories, material, personnel, allowed, believes Wen Wei Wang, to weave a rare symbiosis, an intimacy. “One of the last movements of the piece is a tango, gives Mr. Wang as an example, because it is through this dance that two of the performers began to dance. “

Men or women, separated

Why talk about this universal experience that is immigration only from a male perspective ? “Because it’s a part of me, this is me, this is my point of view, a point of view that is much more “comfortable” and easier to understand. Otherwise, it makes me nervous. “However, his most recent work, Ying Yu, the first of which was held in early February, is inspired by his mother and presented as a tribute to him, and addressing also the power of the feminine, all delivered by the five dancers.

It was also seen here from Wen Wei Wang, Unbound (2006), in which the imaginary and the gestures were blooming around the tiny shoes in the lotus flower that had to wear the chinese women from a young age so that their feet remain as small as possible, the more desirable. “It is a different process for me, details there. Either make a choreography, to be the most authentic as possible, the more close to myself. It is also my sexuality. I have the impression that I’m more close to me, my understanding of things, and that it is easier to be honest then. “In Dialogue, the dancers are of all sexual orientations, notes, however, the choreographer.

The creation, it is always a waltz-hesitation, two steps forward and three back [it’s back and forth]. I do not know. You never know either how it evolves, and what grows in us. And at the very beginning of immigration, first of all you are trying just to survive.

— Wen Wei Wang

Is it not paradoxical to need a side by the distance of time front of the subject, and the other of a very large, close to which does not suffer from the same representation ? Smile in the voice at the end of the thread : “The creation, it is always a waltz-hesitation, two steps forward and three back [it’s back and forth]. I do not know. You never know either how it evolves, and what grows in us. And at the very beginning of immigration, first of all you are trying just to survive. Or you want to change you, to facilitate integration. Later in life, you realize that no, this is not necessary ; and that as strong as I want to change, even if now I speak English, and very well, I am Chinese ; I am still different. I believe that we must strive to communicate more, and we understand each other ; and to recognize and accept the differences, the difference. “

«Dialogue» à cinq sur l’immigration et la différence

Photo: Chris Randle

In Cockpit, seen at the Agora de la danse in 2010, Wen Wei Wang was working on his memories of his youth, and peacock feathers in an atmosphere very dreamlike. More formally, it déconstruisait, distorted and reinterpreted The four seasons of Vivaldi in Three Sixty Five, who had seduced. In 2013, we could see her exploration of “the telepathy of the body” in The 7 th Sense. Speaking of his Dialogue, the choreographer has already said that it was the room where he stood out the most of his formal concerns. A way to be both aware of, but which also happens of itself, according to the creator.

The age of the heart

If he does not perform more himself, while hinting that he could, should return to… —, the dance continues to be part of his life. “Not only in creation, then I move. And when I teach. “What is it that the age has brought qualitatively in her dance that was not there when he was younger ? The voice of Wen Wei Wang becomes deeper, more emotional. “I am now so, so much better to read emotions, to talk about it and feel it. Particularly in Dialogue ; there is a great part where we talk about love. Before, I was terrified at the idea of talking about love, and emotions. I was in control all the time. All the time. I do not allow myself never to cry. Ever. And why ? Love is hard, difficult, it is also true, but so what ? I’m more of a soft somehow I believe [I become a little bit soft in a way]. “

Dialogue

Choreography : Wen Wei Wang. With Justin Calvadores, Dario Dinuzzi, Ralph Escamillan, Andrew Haydock, Arash Khakpour. Presented by Agora de la danse building in Wilder – Espace danse, from 20 to 23 march.

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