Sport

The heart cry of Connor McDavid

Connor McDavid is a discreet young man. And patient.

His cry of the heart, at the beginning of the week, made a big noise. And shake up the whole sporting Edmonton this morning.

“High, very high,” he said when a colleague asked him to measure his level of frustration after the official elimination of the Oilers. We want to be series. I want to be series. I am not happy. Summer will be long. It was a crazy season. We changed coaches, we changed our general manager. It was a roller-coaster season that was very draining emotionally. ”

The future in the short and medium term? “We do not even have a general manager, so it’s difficult to decide on the next season. There are many things to settle. I hope they will put the right candidate in place, and he can build a good team. ”

The last sentence is fraught with meaning. Fallen CEO Peter Chiarelli inherited first-pick draft pick Connor McDavid on his 2015 start-up. He also had three other top picks in the process, and third in 2014, Leon Draisaitl. But he never knew how to constitute a “team”.

Veteran columnist Robert Tychkowski sends an unequivocal message to the owner and team president this morning: they need to listen to their players .

“McDavid did not speak as a frustrated captain by eliminating the team,” he wrote. He says nothing by accident. His comments are always well measured. He is one of the most stubborn and laconic interlocutors in the field. He is well aware of the immense significance of his words. ”

McDavid misses the playoffs for the third time in four years. He has just had a third consecutive season of 100 points or more and would have probably won four if he had not suffered a serious injury in his first season.

The young prodigy Oilers has 115 points so far, his best career production. Draisaitl counts 102. Next is Ryan Nugent-Hopkins with 67 points. After them, the best striker, Alex Chiasson, has 36 points.

As a pair, McDavid and Draisaitl have scored 39% of their team’s goals this season. If we add Nugent-Hopkins, the rate goes up to 52%. The lack of depth is screaming.

The Oilers become the first team since 1989-1990 to hold two counters of 100 points or more without participating in the playoffs.

The most optimistic in Edmonton will be inspired by the Penguins since they won the Stanley Cup the following year.

The Penguins had changed coaches during the summer. Bob Johnson was nominated by DG Craig Patrick, himself an interim coach in place of Gene Ubriaco the previous season.

Scotty Bowman was also hired by Patrick as Director of Player Development and Recruiter.

Jaromir Jagr, fifth overall in June 1990, had a promising first season at just 18, with 57 points, including 27 goals.

In December 1990, the GM also secured defense man Larry Murphy of the Minnesota North Stars for two marginal players. A robbery.

Lemieux missed the first half of the season and the Penguins won just 12 of their first 31 games, but his comeback had an immediate positive effect.

Towards the end of the season, Craig Patrick made another exchange, one of the most important in hockey history, exchanging John Cullen, Zarley Zalapski and Jeff Parker for Ron Francis, Ulf Samuelsson and Grant Jennings.

This transaction would transform the Penguins and give them one of the best offensive center duets in the history of hockey with Lemieux and Francis.

The Oilers are far from this dream scenario. They have a great duo of centers with McDavid and Draisaitl. But they do not have Paul Coffey and Larry Murphy in defense. They have no Tom Barrasso in the net, rather an obscure 30-year-old Finnish goalkeeper, Mikko Koskinen, quickly hired for three more seasons by Peter Chiarelli.

Jaromir Jagr des Oilers has not been drafted yet. They have a 6% chance of winning the lottery, 6.3% of second, 6.7% of third and 73% of eighth or ninth.

Opinions are divided on their best defense prospect, Evan Bouchard, but several young people are doing well in the American League, including Tyler Benson and defender Ethan Bear. The fourth overall pick in 2016, Jesse Puljujarvi, still seems lost in Edmonton. He has nine small points, including four goals, in 46 games.

First you have to find a DG, and a good one. A candidate with a medium and long term vision, able to patiently revive this organization as did Steve Yzerman and Julien BriseBois in Tampa, Brendan Shanahan and Kyle Dubas in Toronto or Kevin Cheveldayoff in Winnipeg.

The list of candidates for the position of DG grows to 10 or 13 names, according to colleague Elliotte Friedman .

But no matter who is elected, will he have a free hand? You have an owner Daryl Katz, who contradicted his hiring in 2012 to force them to recover Nail Yakupov in place of Ryan Murray; a president Bob Nicholson, who already rule the fate of striker Tobias Rieder recently at a meeting with the holders of season tickets; Wayne Gretzky, Kevin Lowe and Craig MacTavish among the senior officers of the organization; Keith Gretzky, brother of the other, as Interim CEO.

Good luck to Connor McDavid is a discreet young man. And patient.

His cry of the heart, at the beginning of the week, made a big noise. And shake up the whole sporting Edmonton this morning.

“High, very high,” he said when a colleague asked him to measure his level of frustration after the official elimination of the Oilers. We want to be series. I want to be series. I am not happy. Summer will be long. It was a crazy season. We changed coaches, we changed our general manager. It was a roller-coaster season that was very draining emotionally. ”

The future in the short and medium term? “We do not even have a general manager, so it’s difficult to decide on the next season. There are many things to settle. I hope they will put the right candidate in place, and he can build a good team. ”

The last sentence is fraught with meaning. Fallen CEO Peter Chiarelli inherited first-pick draft pick Connor McDavid on his 2015 start-up. He also had three other top picks in the process, and third in 2014, Leon Draisaitl. But he never knew how to constitute a “team”.

Veteran columnist Robert Tychkowski sends an unequivocal message to the owner and team president this morning: they need to listen to their players.

“McDavid did not speak as a frustrated captain by eliminating the team,” he wrote. He says nothing by accident. His comments are always well measured. He is one of the most stubborn and laconic interlocutors in the field. He is well aware of the immense significance of his words. ”

McDavid misses the playoffs for the third time in four years. He has just had a third consecutive season of 100 points or more and would have probably won four if he had not suffered a serious injury in his first season.

The young prodigy Oilers has 115 points so far, his best career production. Draisaitl counts 102. Next is Ryan Nugent-Hopkins with 67 points. After them, the best striker, Alex Chiasson, has 36 points.

As a pair, McDavid and Draisaitl have scored 39% of their team’s goals this season. If we add Nugent-Hopkins, the rate goes up to 52%. The lack of depth is screaming.

The Oilers become the first team since 1989-1990 to hold two counters of 100 points or more without participating in the playoffs.

The most optimistic in Edmonton will be inspired by the Penguins since they won the Stanley Cup the following year.

The Penguins had changed coaches during the summer. Bob Johnson was nominated by DG Craig Patrick, himself an interim coach in place of Gene Ubriaco the previous season.

Scotty Bowman was also hired by Patrick as Director of Player Development and Recruiter.

Jaromir Jagr, fifth overall in June 1990, had a promising first season at just 18, with 57 points, including 27 goals.

In December 1990, the GM also secured defenseman Larry Murphy of the Minnesota North Stars for two marginal players. A robbery.

Lemieux missed the first half of the season and the Penguins won just 12 of their first 31 games, but his comeback had an immediate positive effect.

Towards the end of the season, Craig Patrick made another exchange, one of the most important in hockey history, exchanging John Cullen, Zarley Zalapski and Jeff Parker for Ron Francis, Ulf Samuelsson and Grant Jennings.

This transaction would transform the Penguins and give them one of the best offensive center duets in the history of hockey with Lemieux and Francis.

The Oilers are far from this dream scenario. They have a great duo of centers with McDavid and Draisaitl. But they do not have Paul Coffey and Larry Murphy in defense. They have no Tom Barrasso in the net, rather an obscure 30-year-old Finnish goalkeeper, Mikko Koskinen, quickly hired for three more seasons by Peter Chiarelli.

Jaromir Jagr des Oilers has not been drafted yet. They have a 6% chance of winning the lottery, 6.3% of second, 6.7% of third and 73% of eighth or ninth.

Opinions are divided on their best defense prospect, Evan Bouchard, but several young people are doing well in the American League, including Tyler Benson and defender Ethan Bear. The fourth overall pick in 2016, Jesse Puljujarvi, still seems lost in Edmonton. He has nine small points, including four goals, in 46 games.

First you have to find a DG, and a good one. A candidate with a medium and long term vision, able to patiently revive this organization as did Steve Yzerman and Julien BriseBois in Tampa, Brendan Shanahan and Kyle Dubas in Toronto or Kevin Cheveldayoff in Winnipeg.

The list of candidates for the position of DG grows to 10 or 13 names, according to colleague Elliotte Friedman .

But no matter who is elected, will he have a free hand? You have an owner Daryl Katz, who contradicted his hiring in 2012 to force them to recover Nail Yakupov in place of Ryan Murray; a president Bob Nicholson, who already rule the fate of striker Tobias Rieder recently at a meeting with the holders of season tickets; Wayne Gretzky, Kevin Lowe and Craig MacTavish among the senior officers of the organization; Keith Gretzky, brother of the other, as Interim CEO.

Good luck to Connor McDavid..

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Alan Carter
Alan Carter
Alan Carter has been a reporter on the news desk since 2015. Before that she wrote about young adolescents and family dynamics for Styles and was the legal affairs correspondent for the Metro desk. Before joining The Koz Post, Alan Carter worked as a staff writer at the Village Voice and a freelancer for Newsday, The Wall Street Journal, GQ and Mirabella.